Haunted Theaters of Hollywood / Haunted Places in Los Angeles

A documentary film on some of the most haunted theaters in Hollywood, where ghosts are present. These are the ghost stores based on witnesses.

Some of the spooky haunted theaters I talk about are the TCL Chinese Theater, Warner Pacific Theater and the Pantages Theater. These theaters are known to be haunted with ghosts. These are some of the ghost stories of Hollywood. These places are considered to be some of the most Haunted places in Los Angeles, which make it part of the most haunted places in America. If you’re a fan of Halloween or spooky places, these are some of the best places to visit and see for yourself.

TCL Chinese Theatre is a cinema palace on the historic Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6925 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California, United States. Originally known (and still commonly referred to) as Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, it was renamed Mann’s Chinese Theatre in 1973; the name lasted until 2001, after which it reverted to its original name. On January 11, 2013, Chinese electronics manufacturer TCL Corporation purchased the naming rights to the facility, making its official name TCL Chinese Theatre. This resulted in the first affiliation of the Chinese Theatre with an actual Chinese corporation. This is where many famous celebrities got their hand and food prints, such as Marilyn Monroe, Jane Russell, Shirley Temple, Joan Crawford and much more! This is the location of the ghost of Victor Killian and a girl named Annabell.

The original Chinese Theatre was commissioned following the success of the nearby Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre, which opened in 1922. Built by a partnership headed by Sid Grauman over 18 months starting in January 1926, the theatre opened May 18, 1927, with the premiere of Cecil B. DeMille’s film The King of Kings. It has since been home to many premieres, including the 1977 launch of George Lucas’ Star Wars, as well as birthday parties, corporate junkets, and three Academy Awards ceremonies. Among the theatre’s most distinctive features are the concrete blocks set in the forecourt, which bear the signatures, footprints, and handprints of popular motion picture personalities from the 1920s to the present day.

Hollywood Pacific Theatre is a movie theater located at 6433 Hollywood Blvd. in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, on Hollywood’s famous Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Originally known as the Warner Bros. Theatre or Warner Hollywood Theatre, the Italianate beaux arts building was designed by architect G. Albert Lansburgh with approximately 2,700 seats. It opened on April 26, 1928, showcasing the studio’s early Vitaphone talking film Glorious Betsy, starring Conrad Nagel and Dolores Costello. This is the location of the ghost of Sam Warner.

Warner Bros. owned radio station KFWB positioned its radio transmitter towers on top of the building, which remain to this day. Though covered by “PACIFIC” lettering, the original “WARNERS” lettering can still be seen inside each tower.

The Hollywood Pantages Theatre, formerly known as RKO Pantages Theatre, is located at Hollywood and Vine (6233 Hollywood Boulevard), in Hollywood. Designed by architect B. Marcus Priteca, it was the last theater built by the vaudeville impresario Alexander Pantages. The palatial Art Deco theater opened on June 4, 1930, as part of the Pantages Theatre Circuit.
This is the location of the ghost of Howard Hughes and many others.

The Pantages Theatre Circuit had been built on vaudeville, and the new Hollywood theater programmed first-run movies alternating through the day with vaudeville acts for its first two years. But like other theaters during the Great Depression, it was forced to economize and thereafter operated primarily as a movie theater, though live entertainment was presented occasionally.

Alexander Pantages sold the Hollywood landmark in 1932 to Fox West Coast Theaters. In 1949, Howard Hughes acquired the Hollywood Pantages for his RKO Theatre Circuit and moved his personal offices to the building’s second floor. From 1949 through 1959, the theatre hosted the American motion picture industry’s annual Academy Award Ceremonies.[2] It continued to be a major venue for Road show movies into the 1970s. From 1965, it was operated by Pacific Theatres. The Hollywood Pantages closed as a movie theater in January, 1977, and re-opened the following month with Bubbling Brown Sugar, the first of the many stage productions that have since become its regular fare.

Now operated by an arm of the Nederlander Organization, the Hollywood Pantages is one of Los Angeles’ leading venues for live theater (the five highest-grossing weeks in L.A.’s theatrical history were all shows at the Hollywood Pantages). The theatre has recently presented large-scale Broadway musicals such as Disney’s The Lion King, which ran at the theatre for over two years, and hosted the long-running Los Angeles production of the Broadway musical Wicked.

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